by carl wilson

The Only Thing I'm Saying About U.S. Democratic Politics This Week Is

that Barak Obama's theme music is a unique combination of unintentionally hilarious and sincerely moving.

The chorus (are you listening yet? get to it) is especially clever as 1. a chant-along political rallying thing and 2. a subtle solution to the problem that most of your constituents can't figure out how to pronounce your candidate's name. It's 'Hooked on Senatorial Phonics'!

"Ba-RAK! .... Barak o-BA-MA!"

And because it's too kitschy for its own entry: The Interweb is prone to overrating things like William Shatner Reciting Pulp's Common People As A Bad Audition Monologue, I'm well aware. And for the most part the comic effect is shortlived and the irritation factor high; it mostly reminds you how fine the original was. But there is one moment that makes it entirely worthwhile, which is the split second when Joe Jackson enters on the closing chorus and it's so seamlessly done that your ear is fooled for a second into thinking it is Shatner himself suddenly roaring into song, which turns this whole exercise inside out like some cosmic testimony to music. And without all of the anti-musicality and tedium of the track up until then, it could never work. Possibly the best moment in Joe Jackson's career since ... wow, 1986.

Also, a belated thanks to Mr. Jackson for his little salvo last year in the battle for common degeneracy. History is of course against us, and ought to be, but there is no reason not to maintain our totally unviable positional identities for the sake of the decaying culture museums of the unconscious.

News | Posted by zoilus on Thursday, July 29 at 11:44 PM | Linking Posts | Comments (2)

 

COMMENTS

Howdy!

I mean, this:
http://www.campaignsongs.com/

I got it from Lawrence Lessig.

Play Ball!

Posted by Zeke on July 30, 2004 01:11 PM

 

 

Howdy!

You might want to try this, instead.

No Ashford and Simpson revival in them there hills.

Play ball!

Posted by Zeke on July 30, 2004 01:10 PM

 

 

 

Zoilus by Carl Wilson