by carl wilson

I've been wondering when this would happen

Program note today at WFMU: "Stephin Merritt joins Monica today at noon for a celebration of the song 'Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah.' My, oh my, it'll be a wonderful day."

The interview should be available at 'FMU's online archive sometime in late afternoon.

| Posted by zoilus on Friday, May 12 at 11:20 AM | Linking Posts | Comments (9)

 

COMMENTS

E.J.! It's an honour to have you show up here - a blast from the Og Records scene past in my student days in Montreal. I remember "How Can You Be So White..." very well. It was hilarious.

Posted by zoilus on May 23, 2006 7:14 PM

 

 

In 1986 I wrote a beatbox/alt-scat bit I called
"How can you be so white and be so funky?"
Stories got back to me that the few times a comittee would try to ban it as racist, the black members would say go ahead, but you have to include our dissenting opinion, and they'd drop the idea. It was hard to think of my thing as a valid art-form until I was criticized for doing a Black Thing. My reaction:"well,doesn't that make it a Real Thing?"

Posted by E.J.Brulé on May 23, 2006 6:39 AM

 

 

In 1986 I wrote a beatbox/alt-scat bit I called
"How can you be so white and be so funky?"
Stories got back to me that the few times a comittee would try to ban it as racist, the black members would say go ahead, but you have to include our dissenting opinion, and they'd drop the idea. It was hard to think of my thing as a valid art-form until I was criticized for doing a Black Thing. My reaction:"well,doesn't that make it a Real Thing?"

Posted by E.J.Brulé on May 23, 2006 6:39 AM

 

 

Which is not to say that the issues raised can't be discussed intelligently, as they have been on this site. But how misguided does a person have to be, in a world where the majority of people daily battle famine, disease, and poverty, to target Stephin Merritt as Public Enemy #1?

Posted by David on May 16, 2006 3:21 PM

 

 

After listening to the WFMU archive, I went back and delved into the controversy more than I did the first time. The power of the blog! Wow! It's amazing that Jessica could (with just a little assistance) create such a firestorm with so little firepower. No wonder she claims not to be a journalist. Based on reading the last month's worth of her blog's archives, I would say she's not even a writer.

I would, however, say she is the hysterical jerk who yells "Fire" in a crowded theatre when she sees somebody push the button on their Indiglo watch.

Posted by David on May 16, 2006 3:16 PM

 

 

Is Song of the South really a particularly striking case of film racism? I saw it as a kid in the 80's, and from what I remember, it was the standard happygolucky black folks stereotype that you can find in 90 percent of film and tv portrayals up to and including the present day. Racist, perhaps, but garden variety. If that's standard we're going to go by, there's a lot of footage to throw on the bonfire, starting with Gone with the Wind.

Zippety doo da is indeed a fine example of it's kind. The infectiously cheerful and catchy and somehow loveable despite being annoying genre. It's a hard thing to pull off, since attempts usually just end up being annoying. Another successful example is Feelin' Groovy or whatever'th street song. A good example of the typical failure at the genre is Don't Worry, Be Happy.

Posted by Yan on May 13, 2006 4:30 PM

 

 

At the risk of being dated, I acually saw the Disney version of Song of the South in a theatre when I was really, really young. I guess that's why I grew up white, hating white people and white culture. Go figure. Thanks for the "dark" memories...

Posted by Phil on May 12, 2006 5:37 PM

 

 

about an hour into the show i called monica to see if they were actually going to acknowledge the elephant in the living room. she said they were just there to celebrate the song, leaving the conversation to the converationalists. which is too bad, because if anyone would be equipped to engage him in this conversation, monica would be. maybe she was bluffing and they'll discuss it in the second or third hour ...

Posted by bryan on May 12, 2006 12:04 PM

 

 

I'm listening now. The commentary is wrly wrought with a dollop of umbrage. The versions are suitably Lost and Found Video Night. I'm still grinning at the amount of sheer entertainment generated by a little creative friction. Congratulations, critics!

Posted by Half on May 12, 2006 12:03 PM

 

 

 

Zoilus by Carl Wilson